Last edited by Kazigis
Sunday, April 26, 2020 | History

6 edition of Irish Americans in the Confederate Army found in the catalog.

Irish Americans in the Confederate Army

Sean Michael O"Brien

Irish Americans in the Confederate Army

  • 229 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by McFarland & Co. in Jefferson, N.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Confederate States of America. -- Army -- History,
  • Irish American soldiers -- Confederate States of America -- History,
  • Irish Americans -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century,
  • Immigrants -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century,
  • Irish Americans -- Southern States -- Social conditions -- 19th century,
  • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Participation, Irish American,
  • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Campaigns

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementSean Michael O"Brien ; foreword by Kelly J. O"Grady.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE585.I75 O27 2007
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17872901M
    ISBN 109780786429981
    LC Control Number2007012669
    OCLC/WorldCa122309302


Share this book
You might also like
Ju ware of the Sung dynasty

Ju ware of the Sung dynasty

word index to Platos Crito.

word index to Platos Crito.

Transport phenomena in atmospheric and ecological systems

Transport phenomena in atmospheric and ecological systems

The Model A engine

The Model A engine

Front page love

Front page love

In Him was life

In Him was life

Passport to the world

Passport to the world

You Belong to Me

You Belong to Me

Dada lama

Dada lama

pagoda tree.

pagoda tree.

The New York intellectuals and beyond

The New York intellectuals and beyond

Irish Americans in the Confederate Army by Sean Michael O"Brien Download PDF EPUB FB2

IRISH AMERICANS IN THE CONFEDERATE ARMY is an original and significant contribution to the war's literature, especially to the many different ethnic groups that fought in this country's bloodiest conflict.

The Irish that fought for the Union are well known but not much about the Irish that fought for the Confederacy. Author Sean Michael O'Brien Cited by: 3.

A new book, The Irish at Gettysburg, says the real story of the Irish who fought with the Confederate Army is only just starting to be told. Seemingly everything possible has already been written. Get this from a library.

Irish Americans in the Confederate Irish Americans in the Confederate Army book. [Sean Michael O'Brien] -- "Overviews Irish Americans in the South, the Irish immigrant experience and typical Irish Irish Americans in the Confederate Army book soldier, Irish communities' support of Southern war effort, actions where Irish American soldiers.

Beginning with an overview of Irish Americans in the South, the book looks at the Irish immigrant experience and the character of the typical Irish Confederate soldier, detailing the ways in which Irish communities supported the Southern war effort.

The main focus is the military actions in which Irish American soldiers were present in. Focusing on the experience of Irish southerners in the years leading up to and following the Civil War, as well as on the Irish in the Confederate army and on the southern home front, Gleeson argues that the conflict and its aftermath were crucial to the integration of Irish Americans into the South.

Throughout the book, Gleeson draws Cited by: 8. Irish Americans in the Confederate Army. O'Brien, Sean Michael. McFarland & Co.

pages Irish Americans in the Confederate Army book Hardcover E This history explores the often-overlooked contribution of Irish Americans to the Confederate military effort throughout the four major combat theaters of the Civil War.

Irish Americans (Irish: Gael-Mheiriceánaigh) are an ethnic group comprising Americans who have full or partial ancestry from 33 million Americans — % of the total population — self-identified as being of Irish ancestry in the American Community Survey conducted by the U.S.

Census Bureau. This compares with a Irish Americans in the Confederate Army book of million on the island of Ireland.

Famine to Freedom: The Irish in the American Civil War. Cotham, Edward T. Sabine Pass: The Confederacy’s Thermopylae. D’Arcy, William The Fenian Movement in the United States Demeter, Richard Irish Americans A Versified Company: Irish Poetry in the Revolutionary War, Irish Americans in the Confederate Army book War of and the American Civil War.

This comprehensive history explores the Irish contribution to the Confederate military effort throughout the four major combat theatres of the Civil War. Beginning with an overview of Irish Americans in the South, the book looks at the Irish immigrant experience and the character of the typical Irish Confederate soldier, detailing the ways in Price: $ German-Americans were the largest ethnic contingent to fight for the Union in the American Civil War.

More thannative Germans served in the Union Army, notably from New York, Wisconsin, and nds also served in the Confederacy, being primarily descended from Pennsylvania German ancestors who had migrated to the Carolinas in the 18th century and early 19th century, along with.

Focusing on the experience of Irish southerners in the years leading up to and following the Civil War, as well as on the Irish in the Confederate army and on the southern home front, Gleeson argues that the conflict and its aftermath were crucial to the integration of Irish Americans into the South.

Brigadier General Thomas Francis Meagher, Commander of the Irish Brigade. Sadly, many of the battles in the Civil War Irish Americans in the Confederate Army book them against their fellow Irishmen who had immigrated to the South and were soldiers in the Confederate Army.

One of the stories in the book The History of. Book Review: The Green and the Gray- The Irish in the Confederate States of America 'Drop the Liftinant A Curtsey, Woman!': The Long Service of Sergeant James Fegan, 3rd US Infantry ‘How I Came to Kill Your Brother’: A Confederate Reveals an Irish-American’s Final Moments.

This is a list of notable Irish Americans, awarded a American Book Award Lifetime Achievement Award Patrick Cleburne – Irish-born Confederate Army general, nicknamed "Stonewall of the West" Michael Corcoran – United States Army general.

Remembering the Irishmen who fought for the Confederates during the Civil War Born in Ireland and died for the US Confederacy, the fighting Irish on. Book Description: Why did many Irish Americans, who did not have a direct connection to slavery, choose to fight for the Confederacy.

This perplexing question is at the heart of David T. Gleeson's sweeping analysis of the Irish in the Confederate States of America. The Irish have had a significant impact on America across three centuries, helping to shape politics, law, labor, war, literature, journalism, entertainment, business, sports, and science.

This encyclopedia explores why the Irish came to America, where they settled, and how their distinctive Irish-American identity was formed. Well-known Irish Americans are profiled, but the work also captures. Thousands of Mexican-Americans Fought for the Confederate Army in the Civil War By Cindy Casares Featured Book Reviewer.

Joined Jan 7, finally found a group we can blame the war on besides the scotch Irish my understanding in the North alone 30% of the Army were foreign or newly arrived Irish Germans Europeans as the story goes a. I decided to read this book because the only Irish Brigade mentioned in relation to the War Between the States is a Union unit.

Being from the South, I know how many of us have Irish ancestors so I always found it odd that we don't hear much about the Irish in the /5.

Focusing on the experience of Irish southerners in the years leading up to and following the Civil War, as well as on the Irish in the Confederate army and on the southern home front, Gleeson argues that the conflict and its aftermath were crucial to the integration of Irish Americans into the South.

Throughout the book, Gleeson draws. Book Review ‘The Green and the Gray’ by David T. Gleeson. Gleeson looks at the role of Irish-Americans in the Southern debate over slavery, in the Confederate Army, on the homefront, and.

Get this from a library. The green and the gray: the Irish in the Confederate States of America. [David T Gleeson] -- Why did many Irish Americans, who did not have a direct connection to slavery, choose to fight for the Confederacy.

This perplexing question is at the heart of. The often forgotten Irish efforts toward the Confederate Army is the subject brought back to light in O’Brien’s Irish Americans in the Confederate Army.

As I mentioned before, the book does a good job reviewing military performances of Irish regiments in the Confederate army. Part II through Part V of the book break down the Irish. This comprehensive history explores the Irish contribution to the Confederate military effort throughout the four major combat theatres of the Civil War.

Beginning with an overview of Irish Americans in the South, the book looks at the Irish immigrant experience and the character of the typical Irish Confederate soldier, detailing the ways in.

The Irish Experience in the South 1. The New Country: Irish Immigrants in the South 11 2. Fighting Irish: The Character of the Irish Confederate Soldier 00 3.

Home Front: The Irish Family, Community, and Church in War 00 Part II. The Irish in the Army of Northern Virginia 4. Green Flag Unfurled: Manassas and the Valley Campaign 00 5. Book Overview InAmericans on both sides flooded to enlist for what all thought would be a short and glorious war.

Anxious to prove their loyalty to their new homeland, thousands of America's Irish immigrant population were among those who hurried to join the fight on both sides.

A new book, The Irish at Gettysburg, says the real story of the Irish who fought with the Confederate Army is only just starting to be told. Seemingly everything possible has already been written about the climactic battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania—three nightmarish days of intense combat in early July —that determined America’s.

Six Confederate generals were Irish born, and the most significant was Patrick Cleburne. He formerly was a soldier in the British Army, and Cleburne rose to be a major general in the Confederate Army of Tennessee.

His abilities earned him the nickname, “Stonewall of the West. Irish in the American Civil War by SLPL_History - a staff-created list: The American Civil War was a significant event for the Irish immigrants in the United States.

There were million Irish-born persons living in the U.S. in Irish-Americans fought in large numbers on both sides during the Civil War.

Nearlyserved, and tens of thousands were killed or wounded. Irish Americans — Southern States — History — 19th Century United States — History — Civil War, — Participation, Irish American United States — History — Civil War, — Regimental Histories.

However, even before the last months of the Civil War, there were African Americans in Confederate armies who met some of those customary criteria to be soldiers.

Beginning inthe Confederate army formally enlisted hundreds of cooks and musicians; those men were paid, but almost certainly not armed or uniformed.

In the spring ofa band of Irish-Americans who fought on both sides of the Civil War united to undertake one of the most fantastical missions in military history: invade the British province.

In his diary, later published as The Valiant Hours, Cleveland’s Thomas F. Galwey, Co. B, 8 th OVI, reported that after the battle of Fredericksburg both USA and CSA troops ceased-fire so the dead could be collected and buried.

”Jim Gallagher told us that he had met a man from the 16 th Mississippi Regiment (an Irish regiment, it seems). They all, Confederate and Federal parted on good Author: JC Sullivan.

Recommended Reading: Irish Americans in the Confederate Army, by Sean Michael O'Brien [ILLUSTRATED] (Hardcover). Description: InAmericans on both sides flooded to enlist for what all thought would be a short and glorious war. In his latest book, David T.

Gleeson has authored a deeply researched and well-written analysis of the Irish in the Confederacy. Because only 11 percent of the million Irish living in the United States at the time of the Civil War resided in the Confederate or border states, most studies about them during this conflict focus on their experience within the Union (Susannah J.

Ural's The Harp Author: Christian G. Samito. The Union Sixth Army Corps in the Chancellorsville Campaign. Add to Wishlist. Irish Americans in the Confederate Army.

Add to Wishlist. Add to Wishlist. Torn Families. Add to Wishlist. Spiritualism in the American Civil War. New Pre-Order. Add to Wishlist. Add to Wishlist. Lincoln’s Jewish Spy. Reinforcing the book's encyclopedic quality are two useful appendices that offer capsule biographies of Irish and Irish American Confederates and Irish Confederate units, not only in the Army of Northern Virginia, but, curiously, in all Confederate armies.

estimate for how many Irish Americans fought for the Confedera cy, a figure that he places at ab Even more important are the nuances in the book's analysis of how Irish soldiers per formed in the Confederate army.

Some of the predominantly Irish. By John J. Concannon. B y a stroke of good fortune, I became involved in an Irish/Irish American book writing project that is dear to my heart.

(Left: "Brothers of Ireland" by Don Troiani depicts the 69th New York and 9th Massachusetts Infantry regiments in battle at. It was an introduction to the major contribution made by Irish Americans to both sides during the Civil War.

Most students of the war are familiar with the role of Irish troops in the Northern army, but less is known about Irish troops in Confederate service. Irish immigrants of this period participated in significant numbers in pdf American Revolution, leading one British major general pdf testify at the House of Commons that "half the rebel Continental Army were from Ireland." Irish Americans signed the foundational documents of the United States—the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution—and, beginning with Andrew Jackson, served as.Keywords: Irish Americans, Confederate army, Irish soldiers, nationalism North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service.

Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Focusing on the experience of Irish southerners in the ebook leading up to ebook following the Civil War, as well as on the Irish in the Confederate Army and on the southern homefront, Gleeson argues that the conflict and its aftermath were crucial to the assimilation of Irish Americans in the region.

Throughout the book, Gleeson draws.